The River Seph Project

This project is being delivered on behalf of the Derwent Catchment Partnership, with funding from Defra’s Catchment Action Fund.  The River Seph is a tributary of the Rye and work by the Wild Trout Trust identified problems with sediments, fish passage and the management of trees and woody debris.

The project should provide best practice demonstration sites for large woody debris and erosion management, a fish passage easement at Low Mill and, in conjunction with Catchment Sensitive Farming, a significant reduction in sediment pollution within this part of the catchment. The project will particularly seek to address excessive fine sedimentation. Likely sources include: stock poaching, arising from a lack of buffer strips and riparian fencing; stream crossings and road and track drainage; bank erosion relating to tree and large woody debris management; Invasive Non Native Species of plants (Himalayan balsam - largely controlled); and farm and equestrian yard run-off. Some of the sources of sediment identified may be eligible to be controlled by CSF grants, but others may not.

The project will also identify causes of bank erosion and demonstrate sympathetic bank erosion repairs, including habitat improvement works. It will undertake sympathetic management of large woody debris to help stabilise banks and reduce bank erosion whilst also creating important habitat and fish spawning areas. Where appropriate the project will cut back over hanging trees to reduce over shading.

The Derwent Catchment Partnership have recently been awarded £31k by DEFRA as part of the Catchment Partnership Action Fund to undertake habitat improvements on the River Seph in the North York Moors National Park.

The project kicked off on the 9th September with a Demonstration Day on the river to highlight best practice woody debris management. The event was run by the East Yorkshire Rivers Trust in partnership with the Wild Trout Trust and the Environment Agency. The day was attended by over 20 local land owners and riparian managers and was very well received.

The event initiated lots of healthy discussion and was able to demonstrate how leaving woody debris in the channel with minimal intervention benefits wildlife and can reduce flood risk.

 

John Shannon from The East Yorkshire Rivers Trust who helped organise the day said that “woody debris in the channel provides important habitat and shelter for fish. All too often these features are ‘tidied away’ but when managed carefully and left in channel they will help support healthy fish populations”.

The event was also able to demonstrate to land owners how leaving an un-grazed buffer strip beside the river will result in a healthy plant community, stable river banks and less erosion. Duncan Fyfe, Environment Agency Catchment Co-ordinator for the Derwent, said that “the event was a success was because it demonstrated the benefits of relatively low cost solutions to woody debris and riparian management that benefit both the land owner and wildlife. The event also helped us to enlist the support of the local farmers so that we can undertake similar work across the river Seph as we move into the next phase of the project.”

 

The Derwent Catchment Partnership have recently awarded £31k by DEFRA as part of the Catchment Partnership Action Fund to undertake habitat improvements on the River Seph in the North York Moors National Park.

The project kicked off on the 9th September with a Demonstration Day on the river to highlight best practice woody debris management. The event was run by the East Yorkshire Rivers Trust in partnership with the Wild Trout Trust and the Environment Agency. The day was attended by over 20 local land owners and riparian managers and was very well received.

The event initiated lots of healthy discussion and was able to demonstrate how leaving woody debris in the channel with minimal intervention benefits wildlife and can reduce flood risk.

 

John Shannon from The East Yorkshire Rivers Trust who helped organise the day said that “woody debris in the channel provides important habitat and shelter for fish. All too often these features are ‘tidied away’ but when managed carefully and left in channel they will help support healthy fish populations”.

The event was also able to demonstrate to land owners how leaving an un-grazed buffer strip beside the river will result in a healthy plant community, stable river banks and less erosion. Duncan Fyfe, Environment Agency Catchment Co-ordinator for the Derwent, said that “the event was a success was because it demonstrated the benefits of relatively low cost solutions to woody debris and riparian management that benefit both the land owner and wildlife. The event also helped us to enlist the support of the local farmers so that we can undertake similar work across the river Seph as we move into the next phase of the project.”